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Building a Theoretical Model for the Adoption and Diffusion of Ontologies in Road Asset Management

Road Asset Management (RAM) is a systematic process of managing road assets such as pavements, bridges and utilities, combining engineering principles with business practice and economic rational to deliver community benefits.

In order to manage and maintain their road assets, Australian Government agencies use information and services provided by a wide variety of Information Systems. The efficient and effective use of electronic information stored and maintained in various Asset Management Information Systems relies increasingly on exchanging and sharing information between Asset Management Information Systems (AMISs). The emergence of the Intranet and Internet as complex communication channels for exchanging information and knowledge created an opportunity for sharing information on a larger scale across Information Systems.

In order to facilitate the process of sharing information among various AMISs it is necessary to have a common understanding of concepts specific to particular communities of practice and agree on explicit specifications of conceptualizations, commonly known as ontologies in the Computer Science. This study is concerned with the investigation of ontologies relevant to the Roads Asset Management domain, in particular with the factors that affect the adoption and diffusion of such ontologies in government agencies. Based on qualitative and quantitative analysis of the factors that influence the adoption of ontologies in the Road Asset Management sector, this research will build a Theoretical Model for the Adoption and Diffusion of Ontologies in Road Asset Management

Contact Person: Daniela Nastasie